e3e Monitor – Explosion and Extreme Energy Event Monitor

Open science empowering effective response to explosions


Use of explosives especially in urban areas is the defining phenomenon of the last and current century. It and other extreme energy events, is the stuff of everyday global news. But still today and in terms of the nature and extent of the destruction, such events remain in the domain of eye witness accounts or official statements. e3e Monitor would permit with multi technology detector systems a real time monitoring on an entirely objective basis of explosions and other extreme energy events in a given context. By collecting scientific hard evidence for the watching world, e3e Monitor aims to reduce the excesses of violence by making the physical characteristics of an attack publicly available as it happens, improve the information situation for peace-keepers, humanitarian agencies, journalists as well provide new possibilities with respect to prosecution of war crimes.



OUR OBJECTIVE is to make available the technological means on a public basis to monitor explosions and other extreme energy events in real time, objectively and with open-access.

BY designing, building, testing and promoting appropriate technology in the domains of detection and transmission, analysis and presentation of data.

WITH THE GOAL of making publicly available the capacity to:

  • detect the nature and extent of active hostilities involving explosions and extreme energy events;
    monitoring of cease fires;
  • facilitate needs assessment and security requirements for humanitarian organisations with respect to explosions and extreme energy events
  • provide accurate reporting of explosions and extreme energy events on an objective basis;
  • provide people whether affected populations, schools, companies etc. with – objective information pertinent to their own security and well-being;
  • provide the basis for evidence collection for crimes including war crimes;
  • carry out research with respect to explosions and extreme energy events.

How would real-time, objective and open source information about explosion and other extreme energy events bring about change? Who would the end-users be of e3e Monitor?

  • Peace-keeping / enforcing bodies could reliably monitor conflicts and cease-fire agreements.
  • Humanitarian / relief organisations would be able to use the information to assess damage, needs of civilians and their own operational security.
  • The media would have a more accurate and non-biased picture of events relying less on “reports.”
  • The general population would know what is happening and where and so be able to make their own security decisions if, for example, they are moving from one town to another.
  • Airlines would be able to verify areas of active conflict and so change flight schedules, paths and their knowledge of secure airports.
  • Lawyers would be able to use the information as “evidence“ in the pursuit of prosecuting war crimes.
  • Academic and organisations including those orientated around conflict and peace-building could use the information for a wide variety of research projects.
  • With a view to the long term, e3e Monitor technology and networks should become part of the essential infrastructure of any urban environment.

Team

  • Tomoko Muranaka (THE Port & former CERN BE): physicist, detector implementation, technical project management and innovative material specialist.
  • Daniel Dobos (CERN PH): physicist, data communication embedded systems & data filtering specialist.
  • Oliver Keller (CERN Media Lab) R&D engineer, sensors and embedded systems specialist.
  • Brice Copy (CERN EN): engineer, cybersecurity research, middleware development.
  • Leonardo Milano (CERN PH) physicist, detector implementation, data collection and processing specialist.
  • Ines Knaepper (THE Port), MBA, Social Entrepreneur, Project Management & Communications.

Advisory Board

  • Robin Coupland (former ICRC): former field surgeon and medical advisor to the ICRC.
  • Christina Wille (Insecurity Insight) Director Insecurity Insight and manager of Aid in Danger.
  • Friends and Colleagues from CERN and leading humanitarian aid organisations support us with there expertise on:
    • Geographical infrastructure
    • Field data transmission
    • Electronics development
    • Explosives
    • Satellite communication

Concept Art

Additional Information

Synergies Possible with

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  1. Pingback: Urban explosions? Brilliant young scientists are on the case! | Talking Beautiful Stuff

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